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Turns out that Galileo was right and Aristotle was wrong: in a vacuum, a feather and a bowling ball will fall from a tall building at exactly the same speed. This is not to say that Aristotle wasn’t...

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  • August 24 : What Might Have Been
    When we make claims about things that could have been—what philosophers call counterfactual...
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  • August 17 : Remixing Reality - Art and Literature for the 21st Century
    For decades, literary critics have been questioning the relevance of the novel as a literary form,...
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    Whether it's people incarcerated in prisons, or animals confined in zoos, aquariums, laboratories,...

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September 12: Alvin Goldman

Scientists might start with an intuition, but they never treat their intuitions as evidence. Instead, they go out and test them. Philosophers, on the other hand, like to sit in their armchairs and come to all sorts of conclusions based on intuition. But why should anybody treat their intuitions as evidence of anything?

August 27, 2014 | 7 comments | Read More »

Does language affect the way you think about the world? Can the grammar or vocabulary of the language you speak play a role in shaping your experiences? Or is language merely how you give voice to what you experience?

August 21, 2014 | 5 comments | Read More »

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