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  • Week of: 
    April 19, 2015
    First Aired: 
    November 18, 2012
    What is it: 

    With the recent global economic crisis, many people wonder if our economic policies are built on sound principles or on dubious, unscientific claims. What kinds of assumptions does Economics make about markets and the behavior of producers and consumers? What kinds of assumptions does it make about the rationality of individuals? How, if at all, are those claims empirically verified? Or are they just speculative theories proven false by the current crisis? John and Ken pursue their rational self-interest with Alex Rosenberg from Duke University, author of Economics: Mathematical Politics or Science of Diminishing Returns?

    Alex Rosenberg, Department Chair and R. Taylor Cole Professor of Philosophy, Duke University

  • Week of: 
    April 12, 2015
    What is it: 

    We all hope for peace. Yet in the face of violence, it often seems the only recourse is more violence. Advocates of non-violence claim it’s not necessary to respond to war in kind, and that responding violently, even in self-defense, just perpetuates the cycle of violence. So how can we practice non-violence under the direct threat of violence? Can non-violent acts be spread to stop aggression and war? And are there times when violence is, in fact, necessary? John and Ken keep the peace with renowned cultural critic Judith Butler, for a program recorded live at the Marsh Theatre in Berkeley.

    Philosophy Talk: 371: The Art of Non-Violence

    Judith Butler, Maxine Elliott Professor in the Department of Comparative Literature, University of California Berkeley

John Perry and Ken Taylor

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