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The Moral Costs of Climate Change

Week of: 
August 19, 2012
What is it: 

Global climate change confronts us not only with well-known pragmatic challenges, but also with less commonly acknowledged moral challenges. Who is responsible for responding to environmental catastrophes around the world? What kind of help does the industrialized world owe developing nations? What values should we hold onto, and which must we discard, in response to the changing climate? John and Ken survey the moral landscape with Allen Thompson from Oregon State University, editor of Ethical Adaptation to Climate Change: Human Virtues of the Future. This program was recorded live at OSU in Corvallis, Oregon.

Allen Thompson, Professor of Philosophy, Oregon State University

Bonus Content: 

 

VIDEO: Watch the complete program

MUSIC: The Plāto'nes, Worst Case Scenario

MUSIC: The Plāto'nes, Mama Got A Glacier

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